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February 01, 2011

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I would have to support "cultural lag" as the leading cause of income inequality in today's American economy. As a community college instructor, I see this lag on display every day. My classes consist of students who can be completely unmotivated, moderately motivated or highly motivated. A good number of them are even intellectually curious and interested in the subject matter. Significant numbers go on to state universities or earn two year technical degrees that propel them into successful jobs. Community colleges really are on the borderline, so to speak, between the new America of curiosity, ambition, and entrepreneurship and a lagging America mired in resentment, apathy and hostility toward learning and knowledge. Both Americas are clearly on display in any community college classroom.

I think that as the new knowledge economy pounds the underclass ever harder, perhaps we will see a greater willingness to join in the new ways and leave behind what are, essentially, old fashioned "working class" attitudes. Or, the underclass may sink into abject poverty while the successful seal themselves off into "sorted" schools, communities, and businesses.
As a nation, we should focus our resources and creative energies into finding ways to speed up the elevation of the underclass into the new economy. From my front line vantage point, I have to say that will be no easy task but we do need to try. I don't relish the idea of some weird, dystopian feudalism as our national fate!

One is a part of earth, and living upon earth can be far more joyful if one allows for the sensuality of the experience.

Please post more of this. I largely enjoyed it.

Love is in the winter of a sunshine, make the person feels cold and hunger nazr Mohammed human warmth.

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